Pneumonia

At least a couple of times a year I get a serious bronchitis infection or pneumonia. Having a weakened immune system is no fun. I’ve been telling myself for weeks that I wasn’t really getting sick again but apparently you can’t talk yourself out of pneumonia. Because it’s possible to have this illness without even realizing it I thought you might like to know a bit more about it. And explain why I may not be around much for a few days.

The Mayo Clinic’s overview of Pneumonia is an infection that inflames the air sacs in one or both lungs. The air sacs may fill with fluid or pus (purulent material), causing cough with phlegm or pus, fever, chills, and difficulty breathing. A variety of organisms, including bacteria, viruses and fungi, can cause pneumonia.
Pneumonia can range in seriousness from mild to life-threatening. It is most serious for infants and young children, people older than age 65, and people with health problems or weakened immune systems.

There are several causes (other than hospital-acquired) of this serious illness. The Mayo Clinic lists them as Community-acquired pneumonia

Community-acquired pneumonia is the most common type of pneumonia. It occurs outside of hospitals or other health care facilities. It may be caused by:
Bacteria. The most common cause of bacterial pneumonia in the U.S. is Streptococcus pneumoniae. This type of pneumonia can occur on its own or after you’ve had a cold or the flu. It may affect one part (lobe) of the lung, a condition called lobar pneumonia.
Bacteria-like organisms. Mycoplasma pneumoniae also can cause pneumonia. It typically produces milder symptoms than do other types of pneumonia. Walking pneumonia is an informal name given to this type of pneumonia, which typically isn’t severe enough to require bed rest.
Fungi. This type of pneumonia is most common in people with chronic health problems or weakened immune systems, and in people who have inhaled large doses of the organisms. The fungi that cause it can be found in soil or bird droppings and vary depending upon geographic location.
Viruses. Some of the viruses that cause colds and the flu can cause pneumonia. Viruses are the most common cause of pneumonia in children younger than 5 years. Viral pneumonia is usually mild. But in some cases it can become very serious.

There are some potentially very serious complications:

Complications
Even with treatment, some people with pneumonia, especially those in high-risk groups, may experience complications, including:
Bacteria in the bloodstream (bacteremia). Bacteria that enter the bloodstream from your lungs can spread the infection to other organs, potentially causing organ failure.
Difficulty breathing. If your pneumonia is severe or you have chronic underlying lung diseases, you may have trouble breathing in enough oxygen. You may need to be hospitalized and use a breathing machine (ventilator) while your lung heals.
Fluid accumulation around the lungs (pleural effusion). Pneumonia may cause fluid to build up in the thin space between layers of tissue that line the lungs and chest cavity (pleura). If the fluid becomes infected, you may need to have it drained through a chest tube or removed with surgery.
Lung abscess. An abscess occurs if pus forms in a cavity in the lung. An abscess is usually treated with antibiotics. Sometimes, surgery or drainage with a long needle or tube placed into the abscess is needed to remove the pus.

Treatment usually includes the following:

Treatment for pneumonia involves curing the infection and preventing complications. People who have community-acquired pneumonia usually can be treated at home with medication. Although most symptoms ease in a few days or weeks, the feeling of tiredness can persist for a month or more.
Specific treatments depend on the type and severity of your pneumonia, your age and your overall health. The options include:

Antibiotics. These medicines are used to treat bacterial pneumonia. It may take time to identify the type of bacteria causing your pneumonia and to choose the best antibiotic to treat it. If your symptoms don’t improve, your doctor may recommend a different antibiotic.
Cough medicine. This medicine may be used to calm your cough so that you can rest. Because coughing helps loosen and move fluid from your lungs, it’s a good idea not to eliminate your cough completely. In addition, you should know that very few studies have looked at whether over-the-counter cough medicines lessen coughing caused by pneumonia. If you want to try a cough suppressant, use the lowest dose that helps you rest.
Fever reducers/pain relievers. You may take these as needed for fever and discomfort. These include drugs such as aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) and acetaminophen (Tylenol, others).

Hospitalization
You may need to be hospitalized if:
You are older than age 65
You are confused about time, people or places
Your kidney function has declined
Your systolic blood pressure is below 90 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) or your diastolic blood pressure is 60 mm Hg or above
Your breathing is rapid (30 breaths or more a minute)
You need breathing assistance
Your temperature is below normal
Your heart rate is below 50 or above 100

If you’ve been diagnosed there are things you should do to feel better and recover more quickly including:

Lifestyle and home remedies
These tips can help you recover more quickly and decrease your risk of complications:
• Get plenty of rest. Don’t go back to school or work until after your temperature returns to normal and you stop coughing up mucus. Even when you start to feel better, be careful not to overdo it. Because pneumonia can recur, it’s better not to jump back into your routine until you are fully recovered. Ask your doctor if you’re not sure.
• Stay hydrated. Drink plenty of fluids, especially water, to help loosen mucus in your lungs.
• Take your medicine as prescribed. Take the entire course of any medications your doctor prescribed for you. If you stop taking medication too soon, your lungs may continue to harbor bacteria that can multiply and cause your pneumonia to recur.

Image:

Lung: Aspergillus hyphae in fungal pneumonia © Bristol Biomedical Image Archive.

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7 thoughts on “Pneumonia

  • October 16, 2016 at 2:12 pm
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    Great info to be aware and alerted for. I had no idea there were so many types and causes for pneumonia, and the effusion helps me understand what my husband had last year. The treatment you mention is spot on, including the withdrawal of fluid. He was a candidate, hospital was contacted, and thank goodness his effusion had cleared up. I was crying at the thought of him getting an needle pushed through his back into the tissue surrounding his lung, to drain fluid.
    I agree that this is nothing to take lightly, and almost every Mom knows that kids never want to be relegated to bed rest! Thank goodness for XBox, and movies at home!!!

    Reply
    • October 16, 2016 at 6:51 pm
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      Poor guy! And I’m right there with the kids not wanting to stay in bed!

      Reply
  • October 16, 2016 at 2:34 pm
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    I wish you good health and positive vibes mama. I hope all is well with you. Peace and love to you.

    Reply
    • October 16, 2016 at 6:53 pm
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      Thank you, Sweetie. It’ll be good news either way. Either I get better so I can keep telling you how wonderful you are or, if I die, you’re in the Will! LOL

      Reply
    • October 16, 2016 at 8:40 pm
      Permalink

      Thank you. I’m one of the worst patients in the world but I’m trying to behave. Sort of.

      Reply

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